Coolest Homemade Hybrid Ladder

Have you ever thought about what makes a tool great?  Chances are descriptions like reliable, consistent, easy to use, and convenient come to mind, but the ability to serve multiple functions across a wide variety of builds and projects is the one thing that can make almost any tool seem great.  Multi-functional tools are great, but tools that have multiple uses that you dream up and create yourself, now those are the best.

I have a large shop across the street from my house that was included in the purchase of our home.  I have always dreamed of having a large shop and truth be told, we more than likely would not have purchased our home and property had the shop not been there.  Eager as I was to begin my numerous projects in my new shop upon moving I had to complete some much needed set-up and maintenance first.  All of the light ballasts that were attached to the 14ft high ceiling were bad and I needed to install a storage platform to get all of my junk out of our new dining room.  So to kill two birds with one stone, I combined the projects and built this…….

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What is this you ask?  Simple, it is a ladder/scaffold/storage platform/lookout tower/elevated stage hybrid……..On casters.  Before I built this bad boy I knew that I would have to figure out a safe way to change the light ballasts so I quickly began to research rolling ladders and quickly realized that I was not able to spend the money for one at the time.  My next bit of research was done on scaffolding and I quickly found out that I would not be getting a scaffold either.  Lastly, I logged on to check out the price of 14 ft A frame ladders and started to sweat as I was running out of options and could not work in the dark.

After finding out I would blow my storage platform budget on an A frame ladder to change the ballasts a light bulb went off (my shop remained dark though).  I ran to my computer and googled giant wooden rolling platforms (not my exact search term) and to my surprise, nothing.  A few wooden scaffold builds were found on various sites and YouTube, but I could find no evidence of anyone being dumb enough to try and make an 8x8x10ft tall wooden platform roll.  So with no instruction or guidance from the world wide web of information I headed to the home improvement store to get the materials needed to make my dumb idea a dumb reality.

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A look at the platform structure underneath.

The platform build was a piece of cake, it is just an 8×8 platform framed with 2x6s with joists 16″ on center.  The legs are 4x6x8s and were physically tough to attach to the platform with no help and not being cemented or bolted for stability, but other than having to get creative when bolting the platform to them, it was not exactly brain-busting.

The mental strain came with trying to figure out how I would attach the heavy duty casters to the bottom of each 4×6.  I could not lag screw the casters to the bottom because the bolt pattern on the caster’s steel plate was larger than the bottom area of the 4x6s, not to mention I am certain that all the weight on the lag screws would only strip them out and split the wood quickly.  I needed a way to bolt the casters to something that could support the bottom of the 4×6 and then be bolted through the 4×6 posts.  Below was my solution.

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I went to my scrap metal pile and grabbed some 2×4 rectangle tubing and some 7 inch channel iron and went to work.  I cut the channel iron and welded two pieces of it together so that it fit snuggly around the bottom of each 4×6 then I drilled three bolt holes through each.  I then traced the caster bolt plate pattern onto the 2×4 rectangle tubing and drilled the bolt holes in the tubing.  I welded the channel to the top of the rectangular tubing, bolted the casters to the bottom, and installed my brackets onto each one of the 4x6s.

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I ran out of correct length bolts for the last bracket, that explains the eye bolt haha.

It has been a few years since I completed this build and I have plenty of junk piled up on my ladder/scaffold/platform, but it is holding up great.  I do not roll it around very often but every time I do it works great.  Changing the ballasts and bulbs at 14ft is a piece of cake when you have the comfort of a 64 square foot area to work on.

I am not suggesting that you attempt to recreate this build, but if you do or know someone that does here is some info and advice, I am not responsible or liable for any accidents, brace the crap out of it,  and please send me pictures when the build is complete.

I do suggest however, that if you are building a rolling  work bench, table, or  platform that is much closer to the ground, you check out these casters that I used for this project.  Each caster has its own brake and each individual caster is load rated for 1000lbs.  They have held up great and I consider them to be a steal at under $60 for all four.

For more product information, reviews, pricing, and specs on these casters click here. 

My ladder/scaffold/storage platform has served me very well and saved me money on having to both buy a ladder and build a storage platform in my shop.  I know that it is not beautiful, but it is super multi-functional, and that was the goal I was looking to achieve.  below are a few more pictures of the beast.  Thanks for reading.

Please be sure to like, comment, share on social media, and follow tool-school.com.

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Thanks again for checking out my site!

Jake with tool-school.com

Derelict Dagger: Make a Knife from Trash

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Before the knife pictured above became the knife pictured above it was an old lawn mower blade, some scrap aluminum rod, and old wood flooring.  Admittedly the knife is not perfect, but the whole is so much more than the sum of its parts.

Talking to my buddy that owns a lawn service one day he mentioned that he goes through a lot of lawn mower blades each year and instead of throwing the old blades in the trash he had begun to save them to use in various welding projects.  I was impressed to learn that he had some me in him by saving something hoping to later find a use for it and asked him if I could have a spare blade to make a knife with.  He brought me one about a day later.

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Lawn mower blades are hardened steel but are often frowned upon by knife-makers due to a lack of knowledge of the exact metal composition.  I am not a professional blade smith so I was just eager to have some metal to practice my skills with.  It made a clean, very sharp blade.

Since mower blades are already hard I did not heat treat the metal after shaping the knife, I just made sure to keep from overheating the metal when grinding, filing, and sanding the metal so I did not compromise the integrity of the metal.

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The handle is made from a one foot piece of old oak flooring that I pulled up during a flooring project a while back.  I should have thrown it away or burned it, but I knew a use for it would come to me some day.

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The process I used to make the knife was as follows:

  • draw knife shape on mower blade
  • use angle grinder to cut out rough shape
  • bench grind sides of knife smooth to get knife shape, constantly dipping knife in water to keep cool
  • File in edge profile
  • belt grind edge bevel
  • cut flooring to handle size/shape
  • drill holes into handle scales and knife tang (metal handle of knife)
  • apply epoxy to tang and wood scales
  • insert pins through handle scales and tang
  • peen pins to mechanically secure wood scales to knife tang
  • clamp and let dry

You can check out the tools used to make the knife using the links below.  In reality I just needed the angle grinder, files, and one belt sander to make it, but the other ones were convenient.

DeWalt Angle Grinder

Wen 1″ Belt Sander

Wen Bench Grinder

Chicago Electric 1″ Belt Grinder

Skil Drill Press

Round File

Flat File

I know that this knife would not win any beauty contests but it is very satisfying to know that I was able to turn things that should have been sent to the landfill long ago into something that looks good and has a practical use in this world.  It was not the first or last knife that I have made, but it was one of the most enjoyable.  With just a little time and patience you never know what you can do with an old pile of scrap.

Thanks for reading.  If you found this article to be educational, informative, or entertaining please be sure to like, comment, share, and follow tool-school.com.  Have a great day!

Jake with tool-school.com

 

 

 

6 Tools To Make Pressure Washing Easy

Residential grade gas pressure washers like the one pictured above have become very popular tools for homeowners in the last twenty years or so.  Typically pumping between 2 and 3 gallons of water per minute, and producing between 2000-4000 psi, a quality gas powered washer can be purchased anywhere from $250-$500 at most home improvement stores.  The uses for these machines are numerous ranging from house washing to paint stripping.  Though new washers typically come with all accessories required to go to work, below are six inexpensive accessories that will make your pressure washing projects easier, quicker, and more efficient.

  1. Spray Wand Quick Connect

The aluminum male nipple with the black plastic sleeve screws on to the threaded piece that your spray wand hose typically screws to.  The brass female quick connect threads onto the bottom part of the spray wand hose and connects to the aluminum male nipple that is threaded on the pump.  The purpose of these accessories is to not only make disconnecting the wand hose quicker, but also eliminates the need to screw and unscrew parts to remove the spray wand from the machine, greatly reducing the risk of stripping the threads on the wand hose and pump.

2.   5-in-1 Hose Nozzle

This 5-in-1 hose nozzle has worked great for me.  I built my own pressure washer a few years ago and only had a few tips for it that I ended up losing due to having nowhere to store them.  I figured I would give this 5-in-1 a try but I did not expect much from it.  I have been pleasantly surprised by how well it works.  It adjusts from 0, 15, and 40 degree spray angles and also has a soap and flush mode.  Adjustments are made by simply depressing the button on top and rotating the head to the desired spray mode.  It has all the functions that I need for my pressure washing jobs and has held up very well.

3.  Garden Hose Quick Connect

The brass part with the male nipple on the left in the picture simply threads into the threaded part of any garden hose while the part on the right threads onto the part of the pressure washer pump that the garden hose typically threads onto.  The piece that threads onto the pump does not need to be removed from the pump once installed, greatly reducing the chance of ruining any component of the costly washer pump.  To make this quick connect even more effective you can buy a hose to dedicate to your pressure washer that way you will never have to screw or unscrew a hose when pressure washing again.

4. Quick Connect Wand Extension

This quick connect wand extension gives you an extra 33 inches of reach for cleaning eaves, gutters, and high windows.  It is a great compliment to the fifth tool mentioned below.

5.  Gutter Cleaning Attachment

This attachment has a nice bend with two heads that shoot water to either side for blasting leaves, dirt, and debris from gutters.  Coupled with the wand extension above, this setup will allow you to clean gutters safely from the ground opposed to dangling off of a ladder.

6. Pivoting Coupler with Nozzle Tips

The pivoting coupler with quick connect and spray nozzle tips allows you to adjust the spray angle to wash those hard to reach areas.  Though I discussed my love for the 5-in-1 nozzle earlier, it can be helpful to have the smaller individual tips for times when you need to access areas in tight spaces.

For additional product reviews, pictures, and specifications as well as pricing simply click on the product link or picture in this post.

For a ton of great information and comparisons of pressure washer models and brands check out this article from bestdrillreviews.com.

Thank you very much for reading.  Please be sure to like, comment, share, and follow tool-school.com.  Have a great day!

Jake with tool-school.com

DIY Home Air Conditioner Maintenance

If you are anything like me you find yourself getting sucked into a riveting infomercial from time to time.  No matter how useless the product may be to you, or how cheesy the pitch, you just cannot change the channel.  One of the classics that wasted my time on more than one occasion was the ad for the Ronco Showtime Rotisserie and BBQ Oven.  According to the product’s super enthusiastic pitch man, this rotisserie oven practically cooked supper for your family, your only role in the process was to “Set it, and forget it!”   The idea of setting it and forgetting it did not intrigue me in those days as a bachelor as it does now a father of three, soon to be four, youngsters, but would I really trust a heat-generating electrical appliance to behave unattended anyway?

Unfortunately many of us treat our homes as the infomercial pitch man encouraged us to treat his rotisserie oven, just “set it, and forget it”, when we should be tending to it as if we were deep frying a Thanksgiving turkey.  With so many components and systems in modern homes there are so many things that can malfunction and affect other systems in the home negatively.  As homeowners we tend to assume the best for our new appliances, hvac (heating, ventilation, and cooling) systems, structures, and additions, so much so that we leave many of these things unattended and uninspected until there is a noticeable reason to pay them any mind.  This article will discuss a few proactive approaches to home hvac system maintenance that can save you a ton of time and money in the future on reactive solutions.

Below are a few proactive measures that you can take to ensure that you get the most from your home cooling system for years to come.

  1. Outside Components

outside ac

Outside Compressor Unit

  • Routinely check for and remove debris from in and around the outside components of your hvac system
  • Rinse the fins of your outside unit with a garden hose at least twice per year.  Never pressure wash the unit as the strong water pressure could cause damage to the delicate aluminum fins.
  • Straighten bent fins using an a/c fin comb tool.
  • Check unit with an I beam level to ensure that it is level
  • Have unit inspected and serviced by a professional before the hot season when it will be in use

Inside Components

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Inside Coil, Blower, and Return

  • Change your air return filter at least once per month
  • Insulate drain lines to avoid water damage from drain line condensation
  • Install a drain line clean out port like the one pictured below and ensure that the line is not clogged at least once per hot weather season.  I have seen these lines get clogged to the point that water will overflow from the drain pan and flood the flooring of a home.  It is not pretty when it happens.  These lines can be cleaned out by using a wet/dry vac to suction out the obstruction.

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Believe it or not, these few simple maintenance practices can save you a bunch of time and headache in the future.  I actually had to replace a portion of my house’s subfloor due to water damage from condensation dripping onto it from the a/c condensation drain line.  Had the previous owners of my house taken the time to perform the routine maintenance discussed in this article I would be a few thousand dollars richer today.

Regardless of the age of your home’s hvac system I urge you to forgo the “set it and forget it” mentality.  Your home’s a/c system should be tended to like a pan of hot grease and not a slow cooker.  Remain attentive and proactive in the care of your hvac system and you will get the most from it with as little headache as possible in return.

Below are a few additional resources for the maintenance and care of your hvac system that are very helpful and informative.

Essential Maintenance for an A/C Unit

DIY A/C Maintenance and Repair

A/C and Refrigeration Repair Made Easy

Thank you very much for reading, please be sure to like, comment, share, and follow tool-school.com.  Have a great day!

Jake

 

 

Your House is a Deep Fryer, Not a Ronco Showtime Rotisserie

If you are anything like me you find yourself getting sucked into a riveting infomercial from time to time.  No matter how useless the product may be to you, or how cheesy the pitch, you just cannot change the channel.  One of the classics that wasted my time on more than one occasion was the ad for the Ronco Showtime Rotisserie and BBQ Oven.  According to the product’s super enthusiastic pitch man, this rotisserie oven practically cooked supper for your family, your only role in the process was to “Set it, and forget it!”   The idea of setting it and forgetting it did not intrigue me in those days as a bachelor as it does now a father of three, soon to be four, youngsters, but would I really trust a heat-generating electrical appliance to behave unattended anyway?

Unfortunately many of us treat our homes as the infomercial pitch man encouraged us to treat his rotisserie oven, just “set it, and forget it”, when we should be tending to it as if we were deep frying a Thanksgiving turkey.  With so many components and systems in modern homes there are so many things that can malfunction and affect other systems in the home negatively.  As homeowners we tend to assume the best for our new appliances, hvac (heating, ventilation, and cooling) systems, structures, and additions, so much so that we leave many of these things unattended and uninspected until there is a noticeable reason to pay them any mind.  This article will discuss a few proactive approaches to home hvac system maintenance that can save you a ton of time and money in the future on reactive solutions.

Below are a few proactive measures that you can take to ensure that you get the most from your home cooling system for years to come.

  1. Outside Components

outside ac

Outside Compressor Unit

  • Routinely check for and remove debris from in and around the outside components of your hvac system
  • Rinse the fins of your outside unit with a garden hose at least twice per year.  Never pressure wash the unit as the strong water pressure could cause damage to the delicate aluminum fins.
  • Straighten bent fins using an a/c fin comb tool.
  • Check unit with an I beam level to ensure that it is level
  • Have unit inspected and serviced by a professional before the hot season when it will be in use

Inside Components

DSCF6566

Inside Coil, Blower, and Return

  • Change your air return filter at least once per month
  • Insulate drain lines to avoid water damage from drain line condensation
  • Install a drain line clean out port like the one pictured below and ensure that the line is not clogged at least once per hot weather season.  I have seen these lines get clogged to the point that water will overflow from the drain pan and flood the flooring of a home.  It is not pretty when it happens.  These lines can be cleaned out by using a wet/dry vac to suction out the obstruction.

dscf6567.jpg

Believe it or not, these few simple maintenance practices can save you a bunch of time and headache in the future.  I actually had to replace a portion of my house’s subfloor due to water damage from condensation dripping onto it from the a/c condensation drain line.  Had the previous owners of my house taken the time to perform the routine maintenance discussed in this article I would be a few thousand dollars richer today.

Regardless of the age of your home’s hvac system I urge you to forgo the “set it and forget it” mentality.  Your home’s a/c system should be tended to like a pan of hot grease and not a slow cooker.  Remain attentive and proactive in the care of your hvac system and you will get the most from it with as little headache as possible in return.

Below are a few additional resources for the maintenance and care of your hvac system that are very helpful and informative.

Essential Maintenance for an A/C Unit

DIY A/C Maintenance and Repair

A/C and Refrigeration Repair Made Easy

Thank you very much for reading, please be sure to like, comment, share, and follow tool-school.com.  Have a great day!

Jake

 

 

12 Affordable Tools All Homeowners Need, but Many Do Not Have

This is a short list of great tools that many handy homeowners have in their tool bag or workshop but may be absent from the bags and garages of the average homeowner.  It is always nice to have the right tool for the job and these tools can certainly make a project far less stressful.

  1. Kreg Rip Cut

This tool attaches to just about any circular saw and allows for very quick adjustments and rip cuts of boards and plywood.  Adjustable from 2″-24″, this great little device eliminates the need for chalk lines, straight edges, and steady hands to make many rip cuts in a short amount of time.  This thing was a life summer for my subfloor replacement project last summer and will be called to duty again this coming summer when the project resumes.

2. Submersible Water Pump

I have used this little fountain pump to literally bail me out on a few projects.  Removing water from a broken washing machine, an old hot water tank, and from a hole that kept filling with water as I was trying to repair a water line in my yard recently are three examples.  You may not use it often, but when you need it you will be thankful that you have it.

3. Wet/Dry Vacuum

I love my shop vac.  From home to vehicle to shop there is really nothing more that you need for cleaning up dust, water, and debris.  I can (and probably will) write an entire post about the usefulness of a wet/dry vac, it is an all around great tool.

4. Hammer Drill

Hammer drills like this one are really two tools in one.  They can be adjusted to function as a typical drill/driver or switched to hammer drill mode for a simultaneous drill/hammering action which allows the user to drill into brick, cement, and mortar.  A hammer drill is a must have tool for anyone with brick features in, on, and around their home.

5. Bench Vise

Bench vises come in a variety of sizes and styles and can range from $25 – hundreds of dollars depending on brand and type.  Regardless of size, a solid bench vise can make many difficult tasks easy by lending you a super strong third hand to grip materials.  From cutting, drilling, tapping, and threading metals to carving spoons as shown in this how-to article, a bench vise can be useful for just about any project.

6. Fire Extinguisher

I believe the need for this tool is self-explanatory.

7.  Electric Hand Plane

From trimming sticking doors to flattening lumber hand planes both manual and electric have a ton of uses around the house and shop.  You can learn more about the WEN brand of tools here.

8. Pancake Air Compressor

Inflating tires, pools, inner-tubes, and air mattresses are some very practical uses for a pancake compressor, but there are also a number air tools that can be purchased to use with these compressors as well.  I have a large stationary compressor in my shop but still own a small pancake compressor due to its convenience and portability.  They are powered by standard household outlets which make them great for cleaning tools and equipment around the house as well.

9.  DeWalt Angle Grinder

I specifically recommend DeWalt’s angle grinders because I have been burned by several cheaper angle grinders in the past.  I have put my Dewalt through hell and it has yet to let me down.  Angle grinders are great for cutting, shaping, grinding, and sanding metals and some wood working attachments are available for these versatile little tools as well.

10. Oscillating Multi-tool

I just added this tool to my arsenal about a year ago and have kicked myself for waiting so long to do so a few times since.  This thing will not only except a number of different blades and attachments that will allow you to sand and cut just about any material known to man, it will also allow you to do so in some very tight spots and at some very weird angles.  It is another one of those tools that made my subflooring job exponentially easier.

11.  Hand Riveter

Hand riveters allow for the fastening of many different thin materials and sheet metals quickly, easily, and without the need for power tools.  Rivets also come in aluminum which allows for a strong hold of materials without being susceptible to rust.

12.  Hand Truck/Dolly

From moving appliances, furniture and boxes in, out, and around the house to hauling bags of mulch and ready mix around the yard, a dolly can make life much easier.  It seems that I am called upon to help a family member or friend to move every few years and my dolly always makes the trip with me.  It is not an item that I use daily, but when I need it, I love it.

Thank you very much for reading.  For more information,  pricing and reviews of these tools simply click the link next to each one.  All comments, likes, follows, and shares are greatly appreciated.  Work safe!

Jake

How to Make a Wooden Spoon with Hand Tools

Possibly the best thing about making wooden spoons is that it allows right-brained people to experience success and satisfaction in the often left-brained world of woodworking.  In fact, it is not uncommon for some of the more off-script creations to be some of the more interesting and beautiful spoons that are carved.  Not only does spoon making present artistic liberties not able to be had in many other forms of woodworking, but the hobby also allows for success participation with minimal investment in terms of tools.  I actually made my first twenty or so spoons with nothing more than a hacksaw, a wood chisel, and some sandpaper, one of which is the center spoon pictured below.

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The spoon in the middle was one of my first creations using only a wood chisel, handsaw, and sandpaper. It is a beautiful piece of Pecan wood that I pulled from the bayou behind my shop. I like this spoon but kind of wish that I had the piece of wood back since it was so pretty and my skills were so limited when I made it.

THE TOOLS

Before we get into the build, here are the exact tools used for this particular project.  Altogether these tools can be purchased for about $80 on Amazon.  Click the link provided for individual pricing and reviews.

Wood Gouge Set

 Hacksaw with blade storage handle

 Spoon Gouge

  Wood Rasp

  Half Round Wood File

40 Grit Sanding Belts

Though probably not ideal, I typically use the 4″ bench vise similar to this one seen in most of the pictures with a block of wood on each side of the work piece to avoid damage, but a woodworker’s vise would most likely be better due to the fact it is designed for the use.  You can even use less costly work clamps  or toggle clamps to hold your work piece, though they are not quite as stable as a vise.

THE PROCESS

1st – Choose your wood

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For a cooking spoon that will be used you will want to choose a hardwood so that the utensil will hold up to potential daily use. Woods like hickory, maple, ash, oak, walnut, and cherry make very good cooking spoons. I typically use Pecan wood (a species of hickory) because it is readily available to me here in South Louisiana and I think that it is beautiful wood. All of my spoons come from fallen trees and limbs that I pick up myself and make spoon blanks and other things from. You do not have to make your own blanks, you can simply buy untreated hardwood lumber from your local lumber yard and cut many blanks from it.

2nd – Choose your design

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I use this cheap wooden spoon that I got some time back from a local dollar store to get the basic shape for many of my spoons.
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I really like the shape/design of the spoon that I use as my template because it is simple, but offers many options for choosing what type of spoon to make in terms of depth and intended purpose.
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This particular spoon will be a basic cooking spoon, so I added a curved line to outline the perimeter of the shallow bowl to be carved.

3rd – Rough out the bowl

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Using the largest gouge from the set previously pictured, begin to gouge out the bowl of the spoon. Work from bottom to top and top to bottom of the bowl (the direction in the picture and its opposite), not side to side, as this will prevent splitting and tearing of the wood.
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Depending on the depth you are trying to achieve, it will not take long before you have your bowl roughed out. P.S. I suggest waiting to cut the spoon’s shape out after carving the bowl to allow for compensation for potential errors. It is not uncommon to get a little too ambitious with the gouges and cut past your bowl outline or get some tear out. With extra wood on the side of your outline you can almost always compensate for your miscues.

4th – Clean up the bowl

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Using a spoon gouge you will finish defining the shape and contour of your bowl to the final depth.
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Unlike the wood gouge, the spoon gouge should be carefully used in all directions to clean up any previously made tool marks as best as possible.
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All that is left for the bowl is sanding.

5th – Cut out the spoon

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I typically use a bandsaw to cut out the spoon but for the sake of this post I used a hacksaw. It comes out just as good, it just takes a little longer. A jigsaw or handsaw could be used just as well.
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To cut out the spoon without cutting into the curves and contours of the piece simply make a series of cuts horizontal to the spoon up to the spoon’s outline.
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After you make your horizontal cuts, cut along them to remove each block of wood from your previous cuts. Be careful not to cut into your spoon. Do not worry if your outline looks super rough and uneven, we will address that in the next step.

6th – Clean up the shape

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Use your wood rasp to rough out the shape of the back of the bowl and the handle. The rasp will remove a good bit of wood so be sure that you begin with a blank that is thick enough to lose some wood in the later shaping process.
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A half-round file (pictured closest to the bowl) is a good substitute for the rasps when shaping the curves and contours of the handle and the area where the handle meets the bowl.
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After shaping with the rasp and file, use the coarse sanding belt to finish shaping the spoon to its final form. For the back of bowl and handle you will want to use a two-handed “flossing” method to get a nice rounded contour. By “flossing” I mean take one end of the belt in your left hand, the other end in your right, and pull down with your right hand, then pull down with your left, and repeat. Your sanding belt will glide back and forth across the work piece while being oriented like the belt in the picture.
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You can see how much nicer the shape is after the “flossing” sanding method when you compare this picture to the previous one.
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Repeat the same sanding method used on the back of the bowl on the handle to get your final desired shape.

7th – Final sanding

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After the last step you should basically have your final shape, all there is left to do is some progressive finish sanding. Starting with a coarse grit paper (60 grit), sand away all previously made tool and sanding marks from the handle and back of bowl. Once all previous marks are sanded away progress to a slightly finer grit paper (100 grit). Continue progressing to finer grit papers, sanding out all marks left previously, until you get to a 300 or 400 grit paper. Since it is a cooking spoon that will be used often, there is really no need to progress to a sand paper any finer than 300 or 400 grit for the handle and back of bowl unless you just want to for some reason. I personally do not progress to a paper finer than 220 on the inside of the bowl for the same reason just mentioned.
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Front view after final sanding.
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Rear view after sanding.

8th/Final – Sealing the wood

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There are many different food grade oils that can be used to seal the wood. I personally whatever I have on hand in the kitchen which is vegetable, canola, or olive oil.
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I used vegetable oil to seal this spoon. I typically apply a liberal amount upon completion of the spoon, let it dry for a day, then apply another coat of oil and let it dry for a day or two before use.
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I have used coconut oil in the past and it looks great, but coconut oil is solid at room temperature and leaves a heavy residue feel to the spoon once the oil re-solidifies after being applied.

It always fascinates me how sealing Pecan with oil completely transforms the color of the wood.  It takes on a much darker, rich look compared to the lighter color of the unsealed pecan.

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Sealed
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Unsealed

Though there are power tools that expedite the spoon making process, they are not necessary for the completion of a great spoon.  Truth be told I typically forgo many of my power tools for the process described in this post because it allows for better control and accuracy in making the spoon, which leads to a better finished product.  Not to mention all of the tools used in this project can be purchased for about the same price of my Wen belt sander pictured below, and although I love it,  it is just one tool opposed to six.

I hope that you have enjoyed this article and found it to be informative.  If you did I would greatly appreciate if you would like, comment, follow tool-school.com, and share this post on social media.  Should you have any questions or like more information on how to make your own wooden spoons please do not hesitate to ask in the comment section or contact me at jakestoolschool@yahoo.com.  Thanks so much for reading!

Jake