When Pigs Fly….

flying pig 1flying pig 5

At some point in my life my mom fell in love with, and began to collect, flying pigs.  My entire life she has been ultra creative, crafty and quite handy.  As a serial diy’er she also has a great appreciation for the creativity and craftiness of others.  I do not know if I got this trait from her genetically or if it was a product of environmental learning, but I do know exactly who my passion to make, build, craft, and create came from.  The greatest benefit of sharing this quality with my mom is that it often affords me the opportunity to have a lot of fun creating, opposed to buying gifts for her come birthday and Christmas time.  Some years back I began to learn a little welding and with my mom’s birthday a few months away I saw a good opportunity to put my developing skills to use.  I made this flying pig for her out of some old metal that I had around my shop and had a lot of fun doing it.  It is not perfect, but I did not want it to be.  I wanted it to look hand-made and somewhat crude and it does indeed.  My mom loved this gift and has it proudly displayed in the foyer of her house as shown in the picture above.  With a little creative thinking, time, and effort anyone can make gift giving more enjoyable for not only the recipient, but themselves as well.  Below are a few more pictures of the porky present.

flying pig 3

flying pig 2

flying pig 4

Below are the tools that I used to construct this flying pig.

DeWalt 4.5 inch Angle Grinder

WEN 6 inch Bench Grinder

Ryobi 18v Drill

Lincoln AC Stick Welder

Metal Cut Off Discs

Grinding Disc

Flap Disc

Thanks for reading!  Be sure to like, comment, follow, and share this post on social media.

Jake with tool-school.com

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Today Is Earth Day 2018!

Each year since 1970 the 22nd day of April has been celebrated as Earth Day.  Each year various events are held on this day to encourage and demonstrate support for the protection of the environment.  There are numerous ways to celebrate and honor this day each year, some of which will not only benefit the health of our planet, but could benefit the health of your wallet as well.

trash pile

Over the past 6 years I have made between $3,000 and $4,000 in my spare time by selling metals to various scrap yards in my area.  I kind of got into the practice of selling “junk” for money by chance when an in-law of mine asked me to remove a bunch of old metal from his yard and take it to sell at a local scrap yard.  I agreed and was sort of astounded when I left the recycling center with over $200 cash in my pocket.  I was hooked.

 
For probably the next two years I did not pass a piece of metal on the side of the road or at the edge of someone’s yard without stopping and loading it up in the back of my truck.  I also checked the “free” section of Craigslist daily for people offering free scrap metal for its removal.  I can not count how many washers, dryers, microwaves, and refrigerators I have loaded into the back of my truck and taken to the scrap yard, but I have counted plenty of extra money from doing so.  I have even been able to buy a brand new utility trailer using money earned strictly from selling scrap.

 
As mentioned earlier selling scrap metal for extra money is not the only perk to the practice, it is also a big help to the environment.  Recycled metal requires far less processing in order to get it into a useable state than new ores of the same metal require.  This streamlined processing results in far less energy being used to achieve the same result.  According to the American Geosciences Institute, recycled iron and steel requires about 72% less energy to refine than that of the mining and processing of raw iron ore, and there is an 80% reduction in energy use with recycled lead versus newly mined and processed lead.  The AGI also states that in 2017 the amount of aluminum recycled in the United States saved enough energy to power over 7.5 million homes compared to the amount of energy that would have been used to mine and process the metal from raw aluminum ore.

DSCF6318

Pictured above are a few metals commonly sold at metal recycling centers.  These metals are aluminum, brass, iron, copper, and batteries that contain lead.  Nonferrous metals (metals that do not contain iron such as copper, brass, aluminum, and lead) are usually the bigger money makers per pound, while ferrous metals (metals containing iron) are typically paid for by the ton.  To differentiate between ferrous and nonferrous metals simply place a magnet on the metal, if the magnet sticks to it, it is ferrous, if the magnet does not stick to it, it is nonferrous.  Magnets are attracted to iron and as stated above, nonferrous metals do not contain iron.  Retractable magnets like this one are super helpful for differentiating between ferrous and nonferrous metals.  Recycling prices of different metals can fluctuate often and vary from state to state, country to country, and continent to continent, the environmental benefits from recycling metals however is consistent world wide.

For recycling locations near you click the link to access Earth911’s recycling center database, it is a very useful resource Earth 911 Recycling Center Locator.

For the best information on the internet on how to make money recycling just about anything, click this link to Mike the Scrapper’s YouTube Channel.

Below are some recycling tools and equipment that will either help make you money, save you money, or both.

Stackable Recycling Bins

Can Crusher

400 Watt Solar Panel Kit

50 Watt Solar Panel Kit

Rain Barrel

Compost Bin

Folding Limb Saw

This hand saw is awesome for salvaging downed limbs for wood working projects.

Stainless Steel Water Bottle

Wire Stripper

This wire stripper makes recycling copper and aluminum wire much quicker and easier.

Solar Powered Cell Phone Charger


Home Windmill

Scrap Metal Business Success Book

Thanks for reading!  To learn more about any of the products featured in this article simply click the product link or picture for customer reviews and additional product information.

To learn more about Earth Day and its history click this link to the EPA’s Earth Day Website.

It would be great if you would like, comment, follow, and share tool-school.com posts on social media!  Have a great week!

It Pays to be Trashy…..

If you do not believe it pays to be trashy I urge you to check the Kardashian family bank account and get back to me.  Do not let that discourage you though, you do not need a nationally televised reality show to make money being trashy too.  Actually, not only can you make money, you can make money while helping the environment in a multitude of ways.  So how does one make money while simultaneously becoming an environmental hero by being trashy?  The answer is simple, recycling.

trash pile

Over the past 6 years I have made between $3,000 and $4,000 in my spare time by selling metals to various scrap yards in my area.  I kind of got into the practice of selling “junk” for money by chance when an in-law of mine asked me to remove a bunch of old metal from his yard and take it to sell at a local scrap yard.  I agreed and was sort of astounded when I left the recycling center with over $200 cash in my pocket.  I was hooked.

For probably the next two years I did not pass a piece of metal on the side of the road or at the edge of someone’s yard without stopping and loading it up in the back of my truck.  I also checked the “free” section of Craigslist daily for people offering free scrap metal for its removal.  I can not count how many washers, dryers, microwaves, and refrigerators I have loaded into the back of my truck and taken to the scrap yard, but I have counted plenty of extra money from doing so.  I have even been able to buy a brand new utility trailer using money earned strictly from selling scrap.

As mentioned earlier selling scrap metal for extra money is not the only perk to the practice, it is also a big help to the environment.  Recycled metal requires far less processing in order to get it into a useable state than new ores of the same metal require.  This streamlined processing results in far less energy being used to achieve the same result.  According to the American Geosciences Institute, recycled iron and steel requires about 72% less energy to refine than that of the mining and processing of raw iron ore, and there is an 80% reduction in energy use with recycled lead versus newly mined and processed lead.  The AGI also states that in 2017 the amount of aluminum recycled in the United States saved enough energy to power over 7.5 million homes compared to the amount of energy that would have been used to mine and process the metal from raw aluminum ore.

DSCF6319

Pictured above are a few metals commonly sold at metal recycling centers.  These metals are aluminum, brass, iron, copper, and batteries that contain lead.  Nonferrous metals (metals that do not contain iron such as copper, brass, aluminum, and lead) are usually the bigger money makers per pound, while ferrous metals (metals containing iron) are typically paid for by the ton.  To differentiate between ferrous and nonferrous metals simply place a magnet on the metal, if the magnet sticks to it, it is ferrous, if the magnet does not stick to it, it is nonferrous.  Magnets are attracted to iron and as stated above, nonferrous metals do not contain iron.  Recycling prices of different metals can fluctuate often and vary from state to state, country to country, and continent to continent, the environmental benefits from recycling metals however is consistent world wide.

For recycling locations near you click the link to access Earth911’s recycling center database, it is a very useful resource Earth911

If you are interested in helping the environment and making some extra cash check out this tool for help in differentiating between ferrous and nonferrous metals.

 

Thank you for checking out my site, if you found this article to be informative, helpful, or entertaining please be sure to like, comment, follow, and share.  Thanks again!

Jake

Living the Dream

“I’ve been officially working with wood since 2013 when my partner, Kyle, and I launched our company Woodward Throwbacks. My dad is a general contractor back in New York and when I was younger I used to go on some of the sites with him. I believe that is when I truly became fascinated with […]

via Bo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks — Crafted in Carhartt

Wreincarnation: The Definitive Proof.

The fear of throwing something away or getting rid of something that I may one day have a use for is an ever-present force in my daily life.  No matter how useless or tattered an item may seem, or actually be, I struggle.  Do not get me wrong, I do not cling to old pizza boxes and cat turds as if they were ancient family heirlooms as seen on TV, but if it is wood or metal, I struggle.  So of course when I came across an old combination wrench with two broken ends as I was organizing my shop a few months back I quickly bypassed the trash can to deposit it in my tbd bin.  Fast-forward a few months, and Voila!

DSCF6313

DSCF6303

With a little forging, sanding, and file work I was able to turn the old broken wrench into a knife for splitting wood and small logs/branches for use in my numerous wood working and carving projects.  I have only used it a few times thus far but it works extremely well for splitting smaller timber.  Although this hunk of metal has seen its first life come and go, I think that it will see just as much use and even more appreciation in its second.

If you are looking for a good source on knife making check out this knife-making beginner’s guide .  It has a lot of good info for making knives out of various new and used materials.

 

If you found this post informative, useful, or entertaining please like, comment, and follow my site.  Thank you for stopping by!

When Pigs Fly….

flying pig 1flying pig 5

At some point in my life my mom fell in love with, and began to collect, flying pigs.  My entire life she has been ultra creative, crafty and quite handy.  As a serial diy’er she also has a great appreciation for the creativity and craftiness of others.  I do not know if I got this trait from her genetically or if it was a product of environmental learning, but I do know exactly who my passion to make, build, craft, and create came from.  The greatest benefit of sharing this quality with my mom is that it often affords me the opportunity to have a lot of fun creating, opposed to buying gifts for her come birthday and Christmas time.  Some years back I began to learn a little welding and with my mom’s birthday a few months away I saw a good opportunity to put my developing skills to use.  I made this flying pig for her out of some old metal that I had around my shop and had a lot of fun doing it.  It is not perfect, but I did not want it to be.  I wanted it to look hand-made and somewhat crude and it does indeed.  My mom loved this gift and has it proudly displayed in the foyer of her house as shown in the picture above.  With a little creative thinking, time, and effort anyone can make gift giving more enjoyable for not only the recipient, but themselves as well.  Below are a few more pictures of the porky present.

flying pig 3

flying pig 2

flying pig 4

Below are the tools that I used to construct this flying pig.

DeWalt 4.5 inch Angle Grinder

WEN 6 inch Bench Grinder

Ryobi 18v Drill

Lincoln AC Stick Welder

Metal Cut Off Discs

Grinding Disc

Flap Disc

Thanks for reading!  Be sure to like, comment, follow, and share this post on social media.

Jake with tool-school.com